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Boone Day 2016 at the Kentucky Historical Society - 6-4-16

Join Us June 4 for a Boone Day that will be

Out Of This World!

This Boone Day* we’ll show how space exploration and history intertwine in Kentucky – from Kentucky inventor Thomas Barlow‘s advanced planetary model of the mid-1800s to our role today as a world leader in space development.

The day’s activities include:

  • The opening of an exhibit of one of three intact Thomas Barlow orreries (19th century teaching models of the universe). Barlow was a mechanic and inventor who lived in Lexington.
  • A lunch talk by Jamie Day, a Barlow expert and professor from Translyvania University, who will tell how the orrery reflects Kentucky’s robust history of contributions to exploration and discovery; and  Ben Malphrus, director of Morehead State University’s Space Science Center and former NASA visiting scientist, who will discuss Kentucky’s current role as a world leader in space development, including nanosatellite technologies.
  • A curator-led tour of the orrery exhibit.
  • Family programming featuring the character Jet from KET’s animated program “Ready Jet Go!”

Lunch Details

The lunch talk starts at noon with the gallery tour to follow. KHS members can attend for $30. Admission for other patrons is $40. Registration is required by May 27 to Nina Elmore,nina.elmore@ky.gov or 502-564-1792, ext. 4558.

Family Programming Information

Jet will appear from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Admission is $4 for adults, $2 for kids ages 6-18, and free for kids 5 and under. These prices do not include the luncheon program. They do include all Jet activities, KHS exhibits and our history campus.

Boone Day events will take place at the Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, 100 W. Broadway, Frankfort. For more information, call 502-564-1792 or go to history.ky.gov.

*Boone Day is an annual celebration of two dates: June 7, 1769, the day Daniel Boone looked down from a high vantage point, likely in what now is Powell County, and saw the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky for the first time; and June 1, 1792, the day of Kentucky’s statehood.